Links to ADHD Sites and Book Reviews

Books for Parents of Children and Adolescents with AD/HD

  1. Daredevils and Daydreamers : New Perspectives on Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder by Barbara D., Ph.D. Ingersoll (1997).
    A well-rounded book, dealing with the diagnostic process and also practical, real-world behavioral issues.
  2. Voices from Fatherhood : Fathers, Sons and AD/HD  by Patrick J. Kilcarr and Patricia O. Quinn (1997).
    Deals with the vital role that fathers can play in the facilitating the AD/HD child’s development.
  3. Hyperactivity: Why Won’t My Child Pay Attention? by Goldstein and Goldstein (1992).
    This book is useful for parents and also for teachers. It discusses how the traits of a hyperactive child may get him into trouble at school and make him the family scapegoat at home. It discusses parenting techniques and advocates multi-modal treatment.
  4. Attention Deficit Disorder: A Different Perceptive by Thom Hartmann (1993).
    Mr. Hartmann has a unique view of AD/HD. He sees it as a valid cluster of personality traits that have only become problematic as our society has shifted to a more sedentary, detail-oriented lifestyle. He suggests that society should value people with AD/HD because their “action-oriented” style can be useful in the right situation or the right job. He advocates special learning environments for AD/HD children. This book raises the interesting question of how much an individual should conform to society and how much society should make efforts to accommodate individual differences.
  5. The Hyperactive Child, Adolescent and Adult (Attention Deficit Disorder through the Life Span) by Paul Wender, MD (1987)
    This was one of the earlier books to discuss criteria for diagnosing and treating AD/HD in older adolescents and adults. The publication of this book and related articles made it easier for child psychiatrists to continue to treat adolescents who had reached adulthood and to actually diagnose AD/HD in adults. Other physicians have since published broader criteria for the diagnosis of adult AD/HD. This can be heavy reading for the lay person.
  6. You Mean I’m Not Lazy, Stupid or Crazy? by Kelly and Ramundo (1993)
    This book is useful for older adolescents, their parents, and for adults with ADHD. It gives practical, concrete information on how to organize one’s workspace, and how to manage a schedule. It is easy to read selected parts individually. The humorous illustrations are a plus. This is a good book for an AD/HD adolescent to take to college.
  7. Driven to Distraction and Answers to Distractions by Drs. Hallowell and Ratey.
    These books present basic information about AD/HD in a user-friendly format. Answers is particularly good reading for adults with short attention spans because it presents material in short chunks. The books discuss both child and adult AD/HD issues, but the book is aimed at adults. Some adolescents could benefit from these books too.

Books for Children with ADHD

  1. Otto Learns About His Medicine by Matthew Galvin
    This illustrated book talks about a young car who visits a special engine mechanic and receives an engine treatment to help him run at the right speed. The author uses this metaphor to explain the nature of ADHD, the process of getting a psychiatric evaluation and good questions to ask about medication. The book is aimed at some elementary school children and some pre-schoolers.
  2. Distant Drums, Different Drummers by Barbara Ingersoll (1995) (Reviewed in the fall 97 issue of Hypertalk, the newsletter of Baltimore County CHADD)
    This book is aimed at middle and high school students but appropriate for some elementary school students. The author discusses the positive evolutionary aspects of ADHD. She also discusses coping techniques and treatment.
  3. Review by Nicole, age 10
    Do you have ADHD and want to know more about it? The best book for you is Distant Drums, Different Drummers by Barbara Ingersoll, Ph.D.. This book is about the problems ADHD kids might have and how to solve the problems. For instance, one of the solutions to the problems is taking a medicine like Dexedrine or Ritalin. Another solution is to keep your room really well organized, so that you can find everything easily. At the end of the book is a self-assessment checklist with things such as: “I get along with my mom”, “I take turns and play fair”, “I stick with my homework until it’s done”, and “I take care of my room and my belongings”. You would check off either “no problem” or “needs work”. Dr. Ingersoll is a very good writer. This book tells almost every little detail that a child with ADHD might want to know about, except not enough what is good about having ADHD, which is too bad. The author is trying to write a book to teach children about their disorder. The moral is “no matter what color, race, or disorder, everyone can be friends if you try”. This book is wonderful, telling children scientific facts in an understandable way that makes the facts un-boring. This book makes children feel good about themselves, though they have the disorder. I try my hardest to have a few more criticisms for the book, but I fail to think of even one more bad thing about the book. It tells how maybe ADHD may be the living warrior of the past disorder. That could make almost any little boy I know with ADHD feel much better about himself. This book is a wonderful book for any child who battles ADHD. This book is a book that I recommend to especially little boys, this is because there are a few chapters which are about age-old warriors, cavemen, and the Middle Ages. The beginning of the book is for either girls or boys. Adolescents may like the book, but there is a pretty good chance that they will not want to read this book. That is because this book seems to be mostly aimed at younger-than-adolescents. The second bad thing about the book is that through the whole book the author writes “ADHD”, when some of the people who read the book might have only Attention Deficit Disorder, or ADD. I think that the writer should have written “Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder or Attention Deficit Disorder”. That was only a small part of the book though. Still, my over all summary is: Outstanding!
  4. Eagle Eyes (A child’s guide to paying attention) by Jeanne Gehret (1991).
    This book, aimed at elementary and some middle school students, It tells the story of a boy who becomes discouraged by his difficulties with attention and organization. He benefits from evaluation and treatment. Eventually, he comes to see the advantages of some of his special characteristics. (See Ms. Gehret’s book about Ben’s sister under “Sibling Issues.”
  5. Putting on the Brakes by Quinn and Stern (1991).
    This book has become something of a classic during its short existence. It explains, for the older elementary school and middle school child, the definition of ADHD, and gives information about how to improve problem areas, such as disorganization. There is a useful appendix containing information for parents. Parents and children can use this book together. The authors also publish a newsletter for children with AD/HD.
  6. My Brother’s a World Class Pain: A Sibling’s Guide to ADHD / Hyperactivity by Gordon (1992).
    This would be a much better book if the author would change the title. While the title may accurately reflect the feelings of some siblings, the book might get left around and generate some hurt feelings. Because of this, I do not keep it in my waiting room. Once past the title, the book has wonderful, amusing illustrations and the text keeps elementary school siblings interested. The sister eventually does come to appreciate her brother, but kids keep coming back to that title.
  7. I’m Somebody Too by Gehret (1992).
    Those who have read Eagle Eyes by the same author will recognize Emily, Ben’s older sister. It is aimed at an older elementary school or middle school child. Emily feels that her parents are ignoring her and expecting her to maintain perfect behavior so that they can deal with Ben. Emily and the family work with Ben’s therapist to gain an understanding of Emily’s own needs. This book may also be useful for other girls who feel that their families expect them to be too perfect.
  8. Learning to Slow Down and Pay Attention by Nadeau and Dixon.
    This book is appropriate for younger elementary school aged children and some older children who have short attention spans. This book is fast paced and funny. It discusses the symptoms of ADHD and some possible solutions. I liked it because it can be read on more than one level. A parent could first read it to a child, and the child could subsequently either read the entire text, or more likely, read the cartoons and their captions. This book received the enthusiastic approval of a seven year old. Although he certainly could have read the entire text, I think that when he was up in his bedroom, he read and reread the cartoon.
  9. Review by Nicole, age 10.
    The book,Learning to Slow Down and Pay Attention, by Kathleen G. Nadeau, Ph.D. and Ellen B. Dixon, Ph.D., and illustrated by John R. Rose is a wonderful book for children with ADHD. This book is especially for children ages five to ten. This book gives children a checklist of their problems, and tells how to solve them. Also, since children with ADHD have a short attention span, there are fun games scattered through the book. These games help children with ADHD to stick to the book. There is no point in getting a book if people put it down after only a chapter. I think it might be good to photocopy the games in the book so that you can do all of the games and just photo copy it again when you want to do the games again. I really liked the wonderful cartoons that relate to the text. These will also help children keep reading the book. This is a great book, and I recommend it to all children who have ADD or ADHD, or are being diagnosed for it.
    The First Star I See by Jaye Andras Cattrey -Review by Nicole, age ten.
    First Star I See by Jaye Andras Cattrey was a four star book. It was a charming novel for 2nd to 5th graders. It won an “American Bookseller Pick of the Lists” prize. The main character, Paige, has previously been diagnosed with ADD. She daydreams all the time during class, so much in fact, that her classmates call her “spacey.” Her class is having a competition to see who can write the best paper on a space subject that they are assigned. She is absent-minded, so that she forgets about her paper until it becomes an urgent priority. Meanwhile, her dog is stealing toys from children. Usually innocent children too. While trying to steal the neighbor’s cat’s toy, the dog almost drowns. Paige’s dog provides distraction for her when she least wants it. This book is good for girls because they will see in it a character like themselves. They can realize that they aren’t the only person in the world with ADD. They will find that they can succeed with ADD, and that you don’t have to be the perfect student to get what you want. I would recommend this book for psychiatrists and social workers to have in their office. It provides something and someone for the children to relate to. Personally I thought that the book was wonderful and would be a good addition to an ADD-child’s library.

Books Dealing with Adult AD/HD

  1. Attention Deficit Disorder: A Different Perceptive by Thom Hartmann (1993)
    Mr. Hartmann has a unique view of AD/HD. He sees it as a valid cluster of personality traits that have only become problematic as our society has shifted to a more sedentary, detail-oriented lifestyle. He suggests that society should value people with AD/HD because their “action-oriented” style can be useful in the right situation or the right job. He advocates special learning environments for AD/HD children. This book raises the interesting question of how much an individual should conform to society and how much society should make efforts to accommodate individual differences.
  2. The Hyperactive Child, Adolescent and Adult (Attention Deficit Disorder through the Life Span) by Paul Wender, MD (1987)
    This was one of the earlier books to discuss criteria for diagnosing and treating AD/HD in older adolescents and adults. The publication of this book and related articles made it easier for child psychiatrists to continue to treat adolescents who had reached adulthood and to actually diagnose AD/HD in adults. Other physicians have since published broader criteria for the diagnosis of adult AD/HD. This can be heavy reading for the lay person.
  3. You Mean I’m Not Lazy, Stupid or Crazy? By Kelly and Ramundo (1993)
    This book is useful for older adolescents, their parents, and for adults with ADHD. It gives practical, concrete information on how to organize one’s workspace, and how to manage a schedule. It is easy to read selected parts individually. The humorous illustrations are a plus. This is a good book for an AD/HD adolescent to take to college.
  4. Driven to Distraction and Answers to Distractions by Drs. Hallowell and Ratey.
    These books present basic information about AD/HD in a user-friendly format. Answers is particularly good reading for adults with short attention spans because it presents material in short chunks. The books discuss both child and adult AD/HD issues, but the book is aimed at adults. Some adolescents could benefit from these books too.

For more books, including topics such as learning disorders, social skills, and much more, please see our Book Review Site


Our ADHD Articles on the Web

A poem for ADHD adults: It can be fun.

My candle burns at both ends;
It will not last the night;
But ah, my foes, and oh, my friends -
It gives a lovely light!

Edna St. Vincent Millay
A Few Figs From Thistles by  E. St. Vincent Millay. 1920

Northern County Psychiatric Associates


Our practice has experience in the treatment of Attention Deficit disorder (ADD or AD/HD), Depression, Separation Anxiety Disorder, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, and other psychiatric conditions.

We are located in Northern Baltimore County and serve the Baltimore County, Carroll County and Harford County areas in Maryland. Since we are near the Pennsylvania border, we also serve the York County area.

Our services include psychotherapy, psychiatric evaluations, medication management, and family therapy. We treat children, adults, and the elderly.